Australian Illegal Logging Prohibition Amendment Regulation (AUSILPAR) - Guidance for AHEC Members

On 30 November 2014, the Australian Illegal Logging Prohibition Amendment Regulation took effect. This Regulation requires importers of regulated timber products and domestic processors of raw logs to have a complying due diligence system in place to minimise the risk of importing or processing illegally logged timber. The list of regulated timber products includes all sawn timber, decking, mouldings, plywood, particleboard, MDF, joinery items such as timber doors and windows, most pulp, paper and cardboard products as well as most timber and timber-framed furniture.

From 30th November 2014 criminal and financial sanctions will apply to importers of regulated timber products who are found to have to have imported illegally logged timber or a product containing illegally logged timber and who are found to have been negligent. Financial penalties will also apply to those individuals or companies who do not implement a due diligence system that complies with the Regulation.

A document demonstrating American hardwood’s legality of harvest to satisfy Australia’s Illegal Logging Prohibition Amendment Regulation can be downloaded here:

 

AUSILPAR_-_Guidance_for_AHEC_Members_FINAL.pdf

Australian Illegal Logging Prohibition Amendment Regulation (AUSILPAR) - Guidance for AHEC Members

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This guidance is designed primarily for AHEC Members supplying hardwood lumber and veneer directly to Australian importers. It assumes that the AHEC member is a US-based company that does not act as an Australian importer. The guidance is also relevant to US hardwood lumber and veneer exporters selling to manufacturers (e.g. Asian flooring and furniture companies) that are re-exporting products into Australia. Manufacturers of products containing US hardwoods in third countries will be required by Australian importers to provide credible evidence that the “country of harvest” is the USA and gather information indicating low risk of the wood being illegally harvested. In the case of US hardwoods this is best indicated by the independent sector-wide risk assessment.